Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education


^ Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations Conclusions
The information presented by the employees in the field of early care and education can be used to help policy makers make decisions about supporting early care and Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education education programs and their employees to have more resources to support the growth and development of Delaware’s children.


The Delaware early care and education workforce involves approximately 7620 people. This includes Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education program directors, teachers, administrative support staff, cooks, bus drivers, family child care providers, part-day preschool teachers, and teachers in Head Start and Early Childhood Assistance Programs (ECAP). Within the state, 45.4% of the workforce Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education is located in New Castle County. Another 23.9% of the workforce is located in Wilmington.


This Delaware early care and education workforce is largely composed of people with a high school diploma or a Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education GED, who have been employed in the profession for more than 10 years, earning between $20,000 and $20,000 annually. Approximately 66% of the workforce works full-time, while the remaining third works part-time Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education. Most indicated that they plan to stay in the profession for five or more years. They are interested in gaining more education and advancing in their profession.


While 48% of early care and Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education education teachers have access to health insurance, 33.9% have access to dental benefits, and 22.4% have access to disability insurance through their employer; fewer access these benefits because in many cases, the cost for these Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education is shared between the employer and the employee.


In analyzing the financial information provided by some of the early care and education programs and the family child care providers, the Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education largest expense to this business is the staff salaries. Combining the contributions of the early care and education programs and the family child care providers involved in this study, the economic contribution мейд was $37,885,758. The Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education average of the economic contributions мейд by early care and education programs was $512,346. The average of the economic contributions мейд by family child care providers was $35,698.


Recommendations

Given the size of Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education the workforce, currently more than 7600 and growing, it is a professional group to support in improving its services to Delaware families and children. Knowing the geographic distribution of these employees and their desire Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education to be in the workforce for the next five years, it is worth the investment in creating educational opportunities for this workforce acknowledging their current educational level and their preferences for Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education educational advancement.


While most of the employees speak English as their primary language, there are advantages to having staff who speak another language as their primary language. This survey of teachers indicated Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education that 2.1% of the teachers speak Spanish as a primary language and 1.5% of the teachers speak another language as their primary language. To have staff who can communicate with families who speak another language Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education as their primary language and to expose children to a second language are two of the benefits of having staff who can speak multiple languages in a program. . It Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education was found that most of the Spanish and “Other” language speakers were in the lower age groups (infants, toddlers, and preschoolers) with very few non-English speakers in older age groups.

While much Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education of the training available in the state is not accessible in Spanish or any other language, it does indicate that supporting English language learners to work in the profession would have multiple Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education benefits to early care and education programs.


In terms of education of current employees, 26.5% of 40-55 year old employees and 32.8% of employees over the age of 50 have a high school diploma as their highest education Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education level achieved. In addition, 76.5% of family child care providers have a high school diploma as their highest education level achieved. The most diverse age group in terms of education Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education was the 18-29 years old and the 30-39 year olds. Within these age groups, some employees had master’s degrees.


It was found that most of the teachers (42.2%) were between the ages of 18 and 29. This age Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education group of employees may be the most willing to become involved in training programs and higher education. The educational experience of curriculum coordinators indicates that 41.4% have an advanced degree, yet only 18% of Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education these curriculum coordinators involved in the survey had a degree in early childhood education.


Salary appears to be a concern for employees in the field of early care and education. While directors and Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education family child care providers reported earning more than teachers, the majority of employees (83.1%) reporting that they earn less than $30,000 annually. It was found that directors in center program have the highest Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education annual salary and center teachers, and specifically, lead teachers have the highest annual salary of the various types of teachers.


Planning time and being paid for training can be improved for employees Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education in the field of early care and education. While the majority of directors (65.0%) stated that teachers are paid for planning time, the majority of those directors (51.6%) stated that teachers are paid Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education for less than 5 hours per week of planning time. By increasing the time in which employees are paid for planning time, they would be more able to better plan for their classroom. Directors reported Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education that fewer aides are paid for planning time; however, it may be the case that aides are not expected to plan for their classrooms. This may be a task solely Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education for lead teachers.


Early care and education employees, by regulation of the Office of Child Care Licensing to meet annual training requirements. The majority of teachers and aides are paid for Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education less than 20 hours of training per year which if they are financially supported to meet their training requirements would be adequate. If not, this is an expense of the employee.

.

Paid vacation, holidays, and sick Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education leave for employees were reported by directors. Although the majority of directors reported that they offer combinations of these incentives, there were some directors that reported that their program did not Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education offer these incentives for employees. With the low salaries associated with this field, one way in which programs can attract qualified employees is to offer incentives and benefits to employees Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education. It may be possible that paid vacation, holidays, and sick leave may be increased in an attempt to attract more professionals to the field.


Turnover appears to be a concern in the field of early Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education care and education. Of the directors who answered the questions on turnover, 88.1% had experienced staff turnover in the last year. In general, 40% of the workforce has been in the field for Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education more than 10 years. It was also found that approximately 57% of the workforce has been in their current program for less than 5 years. This shows that while employees are remaining in the Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education profession, they may be moving to other programs, possibly for a higher salary, more benefits, or a better position. This situation is not beneficial to children or program development. It would benefit Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education early care and education programs to фокус on retaining employees to provide better care for children, with less turnover.


Eligibility and use of benefits by employees in the field of early care and Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education education is a concern. While health benefits and dental benefits may be available through an employer, it was found in this study that the costs for these are in many cases shared with Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education the employee. However, it was also apparent that those people who did not have the benefit from their employer did have access to the insurance through another source.


When asked about Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education the educational and professional development needs of employees in the field of early care and education, it was found that some employees are currently enrolled in education or training programs. In addition, most Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education employees were looking for advancement within the field and the majority of employees are willing to devote time to additional education in early childhood. This leads to the opportunity to provide Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education education and training programs for employees in the field of early care and education. The preferred method of education and training was courses at a technical and community college and courses Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education through a University.


^ For Future Research:


This experience of surveying the early care and education workforce worked efficiently. The process could be used for other surveys of the profession. In order to monitor changes Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education in the workforce, this survey could be replicated again after some major interventions and activities to improve the economic support to the workforce and to provide them with training opportunities Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education.


^ Appendix One: Advisory Committee


Delaware Early Care and Education Workforce Study Advisory Committee
Martha J. Buell, Ph.D.

Department of Individual and Family Studies

University of Delaware


Janet Carter

Office of Child Care Licensing

Department Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education of Services to Children, Youth, and Their Families


Evelyn Keating

The Family and Workplace Connection


Betty Richardson

Head Start Collaboration

Delaware Department of Education


Kathy Wilson

Delaware First

Office of Child Care Licensing

Department of Services to Children, Youth, and Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education Their Families


^ Appendix Two: Survey Protocols


Delaware Early Care and Education Workforce Study


Census of Employees and Children in

Delaware Early Care and Education Programs


The Center for Disabilities Studies staff will be calling you (or someone Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education you have designated on your staff) within the next several weeks to ask you about the number of people who work and the children enrolled in this program. The information that they Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education will ask is listed below:


Name of the site:


Zip Code:


How many children the program is licensed to serve?


How many children are currently enrolled in the program?


Does Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education the program have a program in the summer for school-age youth? If so, how many additional children are served?


How many people are employed full-time and part-time working with Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education:

Ages of children:

# full-time employees

# part-time

employees

  1. infants who are between birth and 12 months







  1. toddlers who are between twelve months and 24 months







  1. toddlers who are between 24 months and 36 months







  1. preschools who are between 3 years and 5 years







  1. school Section 5: Conclusions and Recommendations - Delaware Early Care and Education-age youth







  1. How many people are assigned to work with more than one age group of children throughout the day?







  1. How many of the employees are under the age of 18?






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